“Why I’m Not a Christian” – Jeremy Larson

Why I'm Not a Christian

I appreciate Jeremy Larson’s handling of Bertrand Russell’s philosophies in his blog post Why I’m Not a Christian.

I have found that atheists are incurably inconsistent. It is true this is a common problem among humans, but it is not an issue with God. That is why when we argue from Scripture, inconsistencies cannot abide. But for the atheist, whose sole ground of authority lies in human reasoning, their arguments are fraught with inconsistencies and holes.

But, praise God, between those inconsistencies I find that God’s Word fits rather nicely.

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6 thoughts on ““Why I’m Not a Christian” – Jeremy Larson

  1. For a very short blog I take a mysterious number of issues with it:
    1) Are atheists inconsistent with themselves or with each other?
    2) Are Christians (do I have to list some denominations?) not also inconsistent with each other?
    3) Can you write a short narrative of the death and resurrection of Jesus that is consistent with all the Gospels’ details? If not the Bible is inconsistent with itself.
    4) Inconsistencies are not gaps, they are the complete opposite. Inconsistencies are mutually exclusive overlaps. There would be no room for a God in an overlap.
    5) Can you give me one issue with secular philosophy that God actually answers?

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    1. AMBrewster

      Allallt, I appreciate the time you took to innumerate your issues with this post. I always respect someone who’s willing to inject themselves into a potential conflict. It shows they really believe in what they have to say. First, let me reiterate what I said above. Humans are inconsistent. Please do not think I am using circular reasoning or the like when I say, if I’m being inconsistent it is because I am not arguing with God’s truth. God cannot be inconsistent.
      1. & 2. I believe both are true, but that doesn’t mean much considering that your second question proves you are aware that Christians are inconsistent as well. We tend to be as off with each other as often as we are with ourselves. But, there are those Christians who are very consistent. My point was that no atheist I have had the pleasure of meeting or reading has ever proposed a completely flawless/consistent ideology of life without God. There are always holes, not merely with other atheists, but also with their own reasoning. God’s reasoning, on the other hand, provides an ever consistent line.
      3. A consistent and accurate narrative of Christ’s Passion Week and subsequent death and resurrection has been authored by various individuals. Perceived issues raised by the gospels have all received proper treatment. Most issues arise from cultural and/or language-related misunderstandings. The gospel narrative contains no actual discrepancies. If it did, you would be correct to say it is inconsistent. If it did, I would be a fool to believe it.
      4. I find your definition of inconsistencies to be unique and quite creative. I cannot embrace your understanding due simply to easily examinable inconsistencies in real life. Stories, accounts, and legal testimonies that are inconsistent are generally assumed to be fabrications. The fact that facts do no align leaves holes for questions to fall through and genuine answers to fill or replace. But I don’t think our figurative disagreement over overlaps or holes will produce much helpful discussion.
      5. Perhaps the best way to answer this question would be to reverse the question. Please feel free to present a secular philosophy and I will do my best (by God’s grace) to answer it from Scripture.

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  2. Questions 1 & 2) we seem to agree that people in general are inconsistent. So the fact that you’ve framed it as a criticism against atheists is a little dishonest.

    3) If you could link a narrative consistent with all gospel accounts that’d be appreciated.

    4) It was a slightly facetious comment based on metaphors. I think we can drop it (but I maintain that a gap in an account is very different from an overlap. A gap is an area where no information is offered, an inconsistency is where at least 2 accounts are given of the same thing that are mutually exclusive. This, metaphorically speaking, is an overlap).

    5) Some of my personal secular philosophy (taken from allalltor.wordpress.com):
    http://allalltor.wordpress.com/2012/04/30/faith-and-justice/
    http://allalltor.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/getting-more-value-from-atheism/
    http://allalltor.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/getting-meaning-from-atheism/
    http://allalltor.wordpress.com/2012/03/29/by-means-of-analogy-christian-justice/
    http://allalltor.wordpress.com/2012/03/08/is-jesus-death-a-good-thing/

    If your stuck on time just look at one or two of these. Let me know how you’d answer these from scripture. Obviously, if you find the time, I’d appreciate if you could answer each of them. If it makes more sense to you, you can answer them in their own comments section.

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    1. Jesus could have said the same things and did the same things on different days. There were no cellphones. He couldn’t have just recording himself saying something and then posting on his blog. In order to reach the most people he had to repeat things in different towns and for different crowds. The Gospel accounts could have been on different days of the same sermon. For example you and I are in the same class with the same teacher but on different days. My account of what happened in class would be different from yours. Even if the lecture is the same.

      Just my two cents on inconsistencies in the Bible.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: #TBTB #TBT – “Why I’m Not a Christian” | Taking Back the Bible

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